Friday, July 21, 2017

UGA swim coach Jack Bauerle gets big boost in pay, extension; track coach also rewarded

UGA swim coach Jack Bauerle gets big boost in pay, extension; track coach also rewarded

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

A liberal Democrat takes aim at Hice’s deep-red Georgia district | Political Insider

A liberal Democrat takes aim at Hice’s deep-red Georgia district | Political Insider



U.S. Rep. Jody Hice represents one of the redder
districts in the nation, a northeast Georgia stretch splattered around
the deep-blue island of Athens. He’s drawn a 2018 challenger who aims to
energize those core Democrats in next year’s midterms.


Chalis Montgomery, a 39-year-old educator and youth ministry leader,
is backing an ardently progressive platform. She lists an immigration
overhaul, criminal justice reform and access to college and vocational
training for all among her policy platforms.


Democrat Chalis Montgomery.
But she’s centering her campaign on a call for universal healthcare.
Her announcement tells of her 9-year-old daughter Gwen, who suffers from
the pre-existing condition of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and thus is
covered by the Affordable Care Act.


She said Hice, who voted to repeal and replace the measure this year
after initial concerns that it didn’t shave costs too deeply, took a
stance that is “devastating to children like her.”


She faces a tougher battle than candidates eyeing nearby suburban
Atlanta districts, like the newly-competitive Sixth and Seventh
Districts, where changing demographics and skepticism to Trump have
buoyed Democratic hopes.


Trump easily carried the 10th District and Hice, who captured
two-thirds of the vote when first elected in 2014, didn’t even face an
opponent in November. (Though a super PAC tried to recruit a local
candidate: And what a disaster that would have been.)



Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Chalis Montgomery announces bid to unseat Jody Hice

Democratic candidate Chalis Montgomery is announcing her bid to represent Georgia’s 10th Congressional District. Her run for congress is motivated by her faith and her commitment to democracy. Montgomery plans to put American values over partisan division and will fight for the dignity and opportunity that everyone deserves.
Montgomery, 39, is stepping up to challenge incumbent Republican Jody Hice, who has failed to fight for the needs of Georgia families and small business owners. Montgomery has lived in Bethlehem with her husband for 15 years and has a daughter who is directly affected by the healthcare debate.
Through her work as an educator and children’s minister, Montgomery has seen the effects of bad public policy and has a clear vision for addressing the needs of her community.  As an entrepreneur, she has witnessed firsthand the difficulties faced by the business community, and believes that much more could be done to spur growth on Main Street. Montgomery recognizes the deep divisions in the district and is committed to being accessible to all citizens, not only those of her party, in meaningful and consistent ways.
https://i2.wp.com/www.georgiapol.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/unnamed-e1500388664667.jpg?ssl=1By contrast, Hice has been inaccessible to residents of the 10th district, failing to hold a sufficient number of open town halls and other events, and has been an advocate for an alienating ideology rather than definitive ideas. Promoting a partisan agenda over the priorities and concerns of Georgia’s citizens has limited the region’s potential for too long.
Regarding the campaign, Montgomery released the following statement:
“I never thought I’d be a candidate for public office, but after hearing the stories of so many 10th district residents, from Athens, Winder, Milledgeville and Dacula, I realized that Jody Hice is failing families, just like he failed mine. My daughter Gwen has juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, a pre-existing condition, and Congressman Hice is supporting an approach to healthcare that would be devastating to children like her, along with our seniors.   
My husband is a public-school teacher and has seen first-hand the challenges our students and teachers are facing in Georgia. Congressman Hice’s only solution to solving this crisis is to eliminate federal funding for education. It’s time for accessible and transparent leadership that works for every voice, and a Congress that supports our God-given rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.  
After praying with my family about launching this campaign, I have decided that the time is now to be directly involved in facing our nation’s challenges.
I look forward to sharing my platform, which includes universal healthcare, better wages, a pro-growth business environment, renewed commitment to our civil rights, immigration and criminal justice reform, national security, fully-funded education, access to college and vocational training for all, and strong communities which are able to fully exercise their voting rights.
In the coming weeks, I will be listening to voters and finding out what they want to see from their representative in Congress, and how I can help. I’m grateful for all the support I’ve received so far, and hope you’ll join me on this journey to bring new leadership to the 10th District.”

Hice staffer pressed on congressman’s position on Obamacare repeal

A star is born (politically speaking) Go Chalis!

Hice staffer pressed on congressman’s position on Obamacare repeal

Health advocate enters race for Georgia insurance chief | Political Insider



A prominent Democratic health advocate entered the
race for Georgia’s open Insurance Commissioner seat on Tuesday with a
pledge to serve as a compassionate voice for consumers, sensing an
opportunity to flip a down-ticket office that’s been held for decades by
Republicans.


Cindy Zeldin, the executive director of Georgians for a Healthy
Future, is the first high-profile Democrat to announce a bid to succeed
Republican Ralph Hudgens. The two-term Republican said Monday he would not run for another stint in office.


“For too long, the office hasn’t been focused on the consumers,” said
Zeldin. “The people need a champion – they need someone who will do
everything to make sure they have insurance options that are fair,
affordable and transparent.”


Zeldin contends the office is too cozy with insurers, and that the
next commissioner should be focused “first and foremost about
consumers.” She plans to step down from her advocacy group, which was
one of the more forceful supporters of Medicaid expansion in Georgia.


Even with an open seat, Zeldin faces a grueling battle. Republicans
have held the office since John Oxendine’s 1994 victory over Democrat
Tim Ryles, and the GOP field is already getting crowded.

Health advocate enters race for Georgia insurance chief | Political Insider

Kemp Hits Back at Abrams' Voter Suppression Jab

Kemp Hits Back at Abrams' Voter Suppression Jab

Monday, July 17, 2017

A creepy airline run-in forges a Georgia bipartisan friendship | Political Insider blog

A creepy airline run-in forges a Georgia bipartisan friendship | Political Insider blog

Priest: How about an amnesty for Trump voters?

The tire amnesty held in Oconee County recently gave me an idea.
 
Citizens were allowed to drop off old tires at recycling centers without paying a fee. The county lost a little revenue, but the amnesty reduced the number of illegal tire dumps and the mosquitoes breeding there. It’s a trade-off.
We need something like that for Trump voters: a face-saving way for them to say – finally – “I made a mistake” without being roundly pelted with harsh volleys of “We told you so!” and “What were you thinking?”
Half of us sure would love to put Trump voters through a gauntlet of recrimination. But it would be better to all come to terms with the frightening nature of a pinball president careening through the White House stopping to tweet – ding! ding! – then watching Fox News – ding! ding! – and onward, heedlessly.



Let’s declare an amnesty period so that we can – together – address the many problems we face in the world.
Pat Priest
Priest: How about an amnesty for Trump voters?

Friday, July 14, 2017

Bishop mayor, state legislator criticize DOT on 441 widening

The Georgia Department of Transportation endured some
criticism this week by both Bishop Mayor Johnny Pritchett and State Rep
Chuck Williams (R-Watkinsville).



 
Pritchett recently asked Oconee County
commissioners to help him and others oppose a GDOT proposal for widening
U.S. Highway 441.



Bishop mayor, state legislator criticize DOT on 441 widening